Eco Blog: dedication to Green Hauling

Why it Matters Where Your Old Junk is Hauled To

September 13th, 2016

Image courtesy of the Dept. of Environmental Protection – Montgomery County, MD

When individuals and businesses require earth-friendly trash hauling  services, they can rely on Fast Haul to handle their unwanted items responsibly. Serving the San Francisco Bay Area since 1993, we have a long history of working with local communities to help keep the planet safe and healthy — unlike many of our “fly-by-night” competitors.

Proceed With Caution

Many lesser-known haulers that show up in store parking lots or advertise on sites like Craigslist are  just random individuals using their trucks to score a few bucks. They  typically don’t possess business credentials and lack training in junk removal hauling. As a result, they often entice unsuspecting customers with unusually low prices and lofty promises. However, as is often the case, you get what you pay for.

The Real Cost of Unethical Haulers

When businesses and residents hire haulers they do not know or recognize, they put themselves and the environment at risk. Unfortunately, unlicensed haulers often illegally dump trash and hazardous waste materials — including batteries, computers, oil, paint and other toxic waste — into waterways, vacant lots, public or private streets, and even parks. They do so to save time and money. What’s more, they do not care about acting ethically, abiding laws and regulations, or respecting their customers and the community.

According to a recent KTVU news report, the issue of illegal and unsightly dumping in The City of Oakland is continuous and seriously on the rise. Residents believe the source of the dumping may be from people outside the area who do not want to pay for waste disposal. If so, it’s very possible that unscrupulous haulers are among the culprits that are negatively impacting the health and well being of the area. This troublesome situation is probably effecting other cities as well.

Make a Difference by Choosing Wisely

Businesses and individuals have the means to combat this growing problem. They simply must select a reputable and environmentally-responsible hauling company such as Fast Haul for their waste removal needs.

Fast Haul cares deeply about the welfare of our customers and the world at large. We do everything we can to protect our customers and the environment.

To improve efficiency and reduce costs, we recycle or donate materials whenever possible. Additionally, we make sure to pass along the savings to our customers with our green promise. To keep unnecessary waste out of landfills, we routinely donate to charitable organizations. We also properly recycle metal, paper, trash, and electronic waste. We also understand and follow guidelines of landfills, donation drop-off points, and recycling centers throughout the Bay Area.

Fast Haul is an established, professional junk hauling company with a focus on keeping customers and the environment happy. When customers contact us, they know we will do our best to handle each job efficiently and safely. Our customers know how much we care about them, and we know they’re worth it.

 

Trash by the Numbers & Why Green Hauling is Important

August 16th, 2016

Every week we roll our trash to the curb for pickup and disposal. Rarely do we give a second thought to where it goes and how it’s processed. However, this “out of sight, out of mind” attitude does not reflect the importance of waste management in America. How to manage trash is a major issue at a national and global level. The issue becomes more critical with the increasing amount of waste Americans are contributing to landfills every year. The growing concern over waste production highlights just how important recycling and green hauling is to our environment.

A Legacy of Waste

trash recycling composting comparisonAccording the EPA, American trash output increased from just over 88 million tons in 1960 to over a quarter billion tons annually today. However, higher rates of recycling and composting today offset some of that increase. The “net” volume of waste discarded to landfills peaked in 1990 at just over 145 million tons annually. As of 2013 that figure remained around 134 million tons.

FACTS ABOUT TRASH

  • The average American generates roughly 4.4 pounds of trash every day.
    • 1.12 pounds recycled (about 25%)
    • 0.39 pounds composted (about 9%)
    • 2.89 pounds of remaining waste (about 66%)

Landfills Overflowing

To deal with an increasing volume of trash, municipalities build an increasing number of landfills. Additionally, they dump more trash into existing landfills far beyond the suggested capacity. Consequently, some regions with capacity issues now transport their waste to neighboring states.

The Big Run landfill in Kentucky was originally designed to hold a modest 7,000 tons. Today, it receives 3,500 tons every day from across the Eastern seaboard! Ohio faces a similar issue, with about a third of their 3.4 million tons of out-of-state trash coming from New York.

Gross Gases

Another hazardous byproduct of landfills involves the end result of bacterial decomposition of organic material. Landfills provide the perfect environment for the creation of methane. Methane, a greenhouse gas, is 84 times more dangerous than carbon dioxide. High concentrations of methane gas in the Northeast US represent a growing problem. For example, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Illinois produce 170 to 205 cubic feet of methane gas daily. The country’s worst offenders are California and Texas, producing a mind-blowing 419.6 and 331.8 cubic feet of methane per day.

Given the numerous issues with landfills, responsible waste management is mandatory. Here at Fast Haul, we work especially hard to donate or recycle as much of the junk we pick up as possible. We aim to send the absolute least amount of waste goes to local landfills.

Will Technology Disrupt Garbage Collection Next?

July 22nd, 2016

Technological advancements have become a part of everyday life over the last several decades, fundamentally changing the way we do everyday tasks. Everything from buying everyday items like groceries and movie tickets to filing taxes and starting a business has become inundated with technology, simplifying and optimizing process that used to occupy a significant amount of time and energy. While these advancements have generally been welcomed, some express concern that tech is slowly snuffing out jobs and even whole industries. Today we are going to look at a few of the recent technological developments in waste collection and analyze how they will affect the industry as a whole.

Electric Garbage Trucks

Tesla Motors, today’s gold standard in automobile innovation, are applying their technology to try and make garbage trucks quieter and more efficient. They are currently developing an electric drivetrain that can be installed in most large-scale collection trucks in operation, replacing the loud, cumbersome diesel engines and transmissions. The electric engines are powered by battery packs, and also help re-charge the batteries when the driver breaks. Should batteries run low, an on-board turbine (running on either diesel or biofuel) kicks in to give the batteries a boost.

Tesla claims that because combustion engines are least efficient on vehicles making frequent stops, the electric drive-train will make a significant impact on the environment and costs. They believe that the engines could reduce fuel consumption by 67%, emissions by 63%, and vehicle maintenance costs by as much as $25,000 annually.

“Smart” Garbage Cans

Compology, a San Francisco-based startup, has created a sensor that can be attached to the inside of any trash or recycling receptacle. By being able to detect and send alerts when the trash is ready to be collected, the developers feel that collection companies can use the data to utilize more effective collection times and routes. The data can be stored and tracked in a native OS for further analysis as well.

One of the bigger selling points for the program is that it is entirely cloud-based, meaning companies will not have to install or hast any software. That means the dashboard can be accessed through any Internet-connected device. Based on their calculations, better-planned routes will cut costs up to 40 percent.

Trash Collecting… Robots?

Easily the most “out there” idea we cam across, the Volvo corporation announced a partnership with several companies and universities in both the US and Sweden to collaborate a project called Robot-based Autonomous Refuse handling, or ROAR. The project aims to create robots to assist in the heavy lifting aspects of garbage collecting (i.e., picking up and emptying the cans).

While the goal is to have the robots operate as autonomously as possible, Volvo will be developing a control panel for the driver to supervise the performance of each robot. Along with preventing workplace injuries among collectors, the robots will also help make the process quitter as well.

With all of these interesting developments in waste collecting technology, one must wonder how this will affect the status quo. Both the electric motor and the garbage can sensors seem to have good upside, given that they would not require the complete replacement of the equipment in use today. Another upside is that it does not eliminate a human step in the process, like Volvo’s robot. Its hard to tell now, but garbage collectors could see this a step towards the elimination of their jobs. Of course this depends on the performance of the robots in the field, but the implications merit paying close attention to further developments.

Bay Area Garbage & Waste News Round Up – July of 2016

July 1st, 2016

As we reach the halfway point of the 2016 calendar year, garbage and waste has been in the forefront across the Bay Area. Today we are going to take a look a several stories and how they stand to impact their respective communities.

San Francisco – Ocean Beach

Residents in the Outer Sunset/Richmond Districts are expressing their frustration with an initiative by the National Parks Service aiming to decrease the amount of litter at Ocean Beach. The seemingly disadvantageous plan, which was set into place in early November of 2015, involved removing 9 out of 19 trash bins along the beach in hopes that visitors would be more apt to take their trash away from the beach and dispose of it at home or elsewhere. The Parks Service cites successes at both Baker Beach and Marin County’s Stinson Beach as reasons for bringing the plan to one of the cities most popular destinations.

Although the Park Service is reporting that maintenance crews are seeing less trash, locals beg to differ. Ocean Beach residents are noticing trash continue to pile up around the trash bins that are left, indicating that visitors are not getting the message to take responsibility for their own waste. Regardless of the complaints, the Park Service plans of sticking with the plan at least until the end of the summer season, but are open to bringing the trash bins back should maintenance crews confirm the sentiments of locals.

San Francisco – Mission District

Last weekends Dyke March, and long running festival celebrating the cities’ LGBTQ community, drew criticism from Rec & Park workers once the attendees dispersed and left them to pick up an excessive amount of trash blanketing Dolores Park. This year’s event adds more fuel to the already contentious relationship between those in charge of maintaining the newly renovated park and visitors.

In all, 25 workers worked long hours starting late Saturday evening to deal the trash, continuing to work through the weekend. One worker, expressing his frustration in a Facebook post, noted that it took 13 Rec & Park employees a total of 86.5 hours to clean up the trash left behind by festival goers. While Rec & Park representatives have pointed at progress since the $20.5 million dollar renovation, which added more bathrooms, increased recycling capacity, and funded a Leave No Trace-style “Love Dolores” campaign, some are quick to point out last weekends gathering that the initiatives are not doing enough to deal with the problem.

Santa Clara County – Milpitas

A waste collection war rages on in Milpitas, specifically over where trash from the city gets dumped. City council recently voted to have waste transported to a south San Jose landfill, opting to not use the nearby Newby dump. Complicating the issue is Republic Services, the cities’ longtime waste collection company nearing the end if their 30-year contract with the city (the city is currently reviewing bids from 4 waste collection companies, including Republic Services). The company’s legal team succeeded in collecting enough signatures to add a referendum to the Nov. 8th ballot, thus giving Milpitas residents the ability to decide where their trash gets sent. Given the Republic Services operates the Newby dump, it is in their best interest to fight the decision.

The council’s decision is influenced by complaints from Milpitas residents of the odors emanating from the Newby dump, hoping that moving the waste to San Jose will help. Unfortunately for Milpitas, it looks as if San Jose residents are not going to take the waste diversion towards their city lying down. Over 6,000 signatures have been collected urging the city of San Jose to take action, expressing worry over how the estimated extra 22 to 37 truckloads of trash will effect traffic congestion, property value, and overall quality of life.

Spring Time Dirt/Concrete Removal

March 25th, 2016

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-blue-sky-leaves-sunlight-background-image33013965

It’s spring time and time many people will begin dirt and or concrete excavation/removal projects. The first thing you need to do is call 811 (USA) underground service alert. Underground gas pipes electrical lines need to be located and marked properly! If you are going to haul away the dirt/concrete yourself, you should understand how much the dirt/concrete actually weights. A cubic yard of dirt or concrete weights over 2,000 lbs. This is the in dump truck or out of the ground weight, not in the ground weight. Your figure a cubic yard of dirt or concrete by using 27 cubic feet = 1 cubic yard or 2,200 lbs.

Example – if you are digging a 3x3x3 foot hole for a new tree (which is 1 cubic yard), this is a ground measurement, out of ground and in dump truck. This amount almost doubles so be careful, your best bet is to call an experienced dirt/concrete company with the proper equipment such as a front end loader and dump truck to take the dirt concrete away to the proper dumping location or landfill.

 
 
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