Posts Tagged ‘waste reduction’

Eco Blog: dedication to Green Hauling

Around the Bay Area in Waste Management (June 2018)

June 8th, 2018

Here at Fast Haul, we are committed to doing our part to help reduce the percentage of waste materials in the Bay Area going into landfills. Through recycling and donations, many large, bulky, and unwanted items can be diverted and re-used or re-purposed.

Below is a summary of recent news from around the Bay Area related to waste reduction efforts and ensuring a slightly greener planet for all of us:


Call2Recycle launches Bay Area battery safety campaign

“Call2Recycle announced Tuesday a new battery safety campaign with industry partners and Bay Area MRFs and waste facilities to educate California consumers about the “hidden dangers” of improper battery disposal, particularly regarding lithium-based batteries.

The “Avoid the Spark” campaign will focus on bringing best practices to Alameda, Marin, Santa Clara, San Francisco and San Mateo.”

Read the full article by Kristin Musulin at Waste Dive here: https://www.wastedive.com/news/call2recycle-launches-bay-area-battery-safety-campaign/523606/


SF to consider banning plastic straws

“In San Francisco, plastic drinking straws could soon be going the way of non-reusable shopping bags and Styrofoam containers — that is to say, strictly prohibited within city limits.

On Tuesday, Supervisor Katy Tang is expected to roll out legislation that would count San Francisco among the growing list of cities seeking to cut down on environmentally noxious litter by prohibiting restaurants, bars and coffee shops from stuffing plastic straws, stirrers or cocktail sticks into the drinks they serve.”

Read the full article by Dominic Fracassa of the San Francisco Chronicle here: https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/SF-to-consider-banning-plastic-straws-12913930.php

https://twitter.com/ecowatchADZU/status/1004685636383563776


How the Bay Area is impacted by chaos in US recycling industry

“The U.S. could soon drown in a sea of recycled paper, plastic and cardboard because overseas companies that reprocess it into new products can’t handle the load. A decision made by China against accepting U.S. recycling is causing chaos.

This problem is coming to your house, and everyone else’s. It’s time to learn how to generate less recycling or learn to live in it.”

Read the full article by Tom Vacar of KTVU at: http://www.ktvu.com/news/how-the-bay-area-is-impacted-by-chaos-in-us-recycling-industry


5 Tips on How to Stay Waste-Free at Work

August 23rd, 2017

recycling and composting at work

Businesses are producing large amounts of unnecessary waste. Despite the fact that about 80% of office waste is recyclable or reusable, the vast majority of office items end up in a landfill due to the lack of proper systems.

However, more and more offices are striving to be more eco-friendly and push to “go green.” There are different ways to do so. For example, it may include recycling electronics and office supplies, use of low-watt bulbs, turning off printers when and/or computers when not in use, etc.

Here are a few tips on how to stay waste-free at your work.

1. Start with Preparing Your Office for Recycling

Before facing your office waste, you should prepare for recycling. This include:

  • Finding the best recycling program that addresses office recycling;
  • Searching for state or city incentives for eco-friendly offices;
  • Hire a professional to head up a waste reduction or recycling program;
  • Establish the general list of rules all employees have to abide.

2. Clean Up Your Office Thoroughly

Why is it important? While cleaning your office, you will be surprised how many things make the waste in your office. Thorough cleaning will help you determine what items you don’t need at your office. Your best choice is to hire an expert in office cleaning that offers personalized services. Check out these cleaning services in Mississauga as an example of how to make your workplace feel fresh.

3. Reuse Office Supplies

Most of the office supplies can be recycled or reused. What can you do? Create a special room where the employees will be able to shop or leave used office supplies such as paper clips, hanging folders, file folders, binders, rubber bands, pencils, and pens. Even better, do not allow employees to access new office supplies by keeping them under lock and key. That will make people start thinking how to reuse office supplies.

4. Cut Down On Paper

Think twice before posting or printing. Posting and/or printing something out that you will never use becomes a waste in your office. You can recycle most office paper, but it’s just an additional expense for you. Instead, try to reduce recycling program budget by cutting down on paper. Here’s what you can do:

  • Consider whether you really need a paperwork or not;
  • Email rather than posting/printing out;
  • Ask your employees to post and print only what is truly necessary;
  • Use the double-sided printing whenever possible;
  • Avoid using stapled and colored paper because it’s not recyclable.

Over the time, the paper will overcrowd your office and you will need to recycle it. That’s why you should put a lot of paper recycling bins or boxes throughout the workplace. Choose the convenient areas for this purpose. Make sure to position recycle bins next to the desks and put a few of them in non-office rooms such as the warehouse or kitchen. That will encourage the employees to chuck paper in the recycle bins.

5. Recycle Old Computers, Accessories, and Appliances

When buying a new computer, ask the seller to buy back or take back your old one. Many companies provide e-waste recycling programs that allow this. Others may charge you a small recycling fee. You may also donate the old computers that are still in good working condition to organizations which refurbish electronic devices. Aside from computers and computer accessories, you can also consider recycling old televisions and other appliances.

 

Be sure to follow these five tips and get rid of office waste!

2016’s Top Innovations in Recycling

December 13th, 2016

Recycling, which was once a fad of environmentalists and so-called “tree huggers” is now mainstream in nearly every developed world community and here to stay.  The benefits of recycling, and the perils of not doing it, have become crystal clear.  In the U.S. today, we have reached a 34.6% recycling rate as of 2014.  In just that one year, the recycling and composting of 89 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) resulted in a reduction of over 181 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions.

Advances in recycling depend not only on buy-in from consumers and businesses, but also consistent innovation from scientists, engineers, and inventors.  Here are just six top recycling innovations from the past year:

1. Diesel Fuel

A group of University of Illinois researchers have found a way to transform used grocery bags into diesel fuel and other petroleum products.  Another benefit is that the energy used in the conversion process is less than the recovered energy.

2. Lightbulb Recycling

We’re all used to seeing those reverse vending machines that give you cash for your bottles or cans.  Now, there are the same sorts of machines in some countries that will pay you to recycle your used lightbulbs.  The machines were built by a UK firm called reVend and can be found in Brazil, the UAE, and the UK.

3. Concrete Bricks

A recent architectural graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Albany, New York has developed a sustainable building material from discarded plastic.   Henry Miller took plastic bags and other plastic refuse and discovered a way to mix them with concrete to form bricks that had substantial environmental benefits.  Plastics are being recycled for use in building and the concrete mix no longer needs mined aggregate as an ingredient.

4. Wi-Fi Recycling

Finland wanted to take a look at the amount of time and fuel that they were wasting by driving around to pick up nearly empty recycling bins at homes and businesses.  If they were polluting the environment with emissions, the gains from recycling were being effectively canceled.  A firm called Enevo invented a Wi-Fi sensor that attaches to the bins, letting the collectors know fill levels so that they only come out to collect when bins are full.

5. iRecycle

Recycling isn’t just a trend; it’s become a way of life for many people around the globe.  Fortunately, we have the support of technology to help us make the most of our recycling efforts.  U.S. residents can download an App called iRecycle.  This gives users access to more than 1.6 million ways to recycle more than 350 materials.  Users can search from their current location or enter an address for nearby recycling facilities.

6. Olio

A growing trend, which has picked up steam in Europe with several well-placed regulations, is not wasting food.  Two developers, Sasha Celestial-One and Tessa Cook, have developed an App called Olio that makes it simpler for individuals and local businesses to participate in this movement.  Users can share information on surplus food items available, giving instructions for pick-up.  The App is currently being used in the UK and Ireland but is set for expansion to other countries.

Even though the U.S. is one of the countries with the highest recycling rates, we still have a long way to go. Recycling efforts and innovation is an ongoing process. Fortunately, we’re continuing to see new developments each year that promise improvements and instill the hope of sustainable communities in the future.

 
 
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